opensuse 10.3 sequence of commands

Live forum: http://rt2x00.serialmonkey.com/viewtopic.php?t=4406

welm

04-11-2007 08:39:29

Hi!

I'm using Opensuse 10.3, kernel 2.6.22.9-0.4-default, rt61-cvs-2007110111. RaLink RT2561/RT61 rev B 802.11g

While creating an ad-hoc connection, I found the Suse-Scripts produced the following sequence of commands

iwconfig wlan0 mode ad-hoc
iwconfig wlan0 nick bea
iwconfig wlan0 channel 1
iwconfig wlan0 key off
iwconfig wlan0 essid OGTWDESR
ip link set up dev wlan0

The last command removes the ESSID and changes the Bit Rate 54 to 11. (according to "iwconfig wlan0")

Is the removal of the ESSID to be expected?
If yes Is the Suse concept of first emitting all of the iwconfig commands wrong?

Is it a problem, that all of the iwconfig commands except for the second one lead to an output of "BUG nil ifname" in "ip monitor all"?

Thanks
Welm

Spy84464

04-11-2007 15:31:08

Hello,
I have no idea what that last command is supposed to do. It looks rather Suse specific, maybe you should ask on Suse forums?
Same with "BUG nil ifname", vanilla "iwconfig" never produces that kind of output.

Regards,
Romain

welm

04-11-2007 17:11:26

Hi,

Hello,
I have no idea what that last command is supposed to do. It looks rather Suse specific, maybe you should ask on Suse forums?
[/quote3rbiqizu]

No, it's not Suse specific. "ip" replaced "ipconfig" in Linux kernel 2.2 and "ipconfig" is only a partial interface to the ip functionality since then. In ifconfigs notation the last command line would be "ifconfig wlan0 up".

Same with "BUG nil ifname", vanilla "iwconfig" never produces that kind of output.
[/quote3rbiqizu]

That output came from an "ip monitor all" running concurrently in another window. I don't really know, what it does, but it's a kind of kernel message dumping for changes in the network. Google gave some hints in 2004 or 2005 there have been problems with misinterpreted kernel messages related to wireless interfaces, which produced such outputs. I've also seen patches for that but I don't know the current state.

Regards,
Welm

Spy84464

10-11-2007 10:29:58

Well, I don't know. Usually, legacy drivers have to be configured after the interface has been brought up.

welm

11-11-2007 13:41:24

Well, I don't know. Usually, legacy drivers have to be configured after the interface has been brought up.[/quote1rmmg4r0]

Thank you.


So here are some experiences/recipes for using the rt61 under suse 10.3 (Working with an openvpn tunnel through an unencrypted ad-hoc connection)

The kernel sources should be installed.

Whenever you have a new kernel ([b1rmmg4r0]after[/b1rmmg4r0] rebooting, before compiling any kernel-modules ) do
[code1rmmg4r0]cd /usr/src/linux
make mrproper
make cloneconfig
make modules_prepare
[/code1rmmg4r0]
The file /etc/modprobe.d/unsupported.blacklist should end with the line
[code1rmmg4r0]##include modules.unsupported.blacklist[/code1rmmg4r0]
The "##" are sometimes missing after an update -- AFAIK this is not correct -- add them. (Otherwise the loading of the rt61 kernel module will not be done automatically.)

Suse 10.3 contains an rt2x00 package -- it did not work for me. If it is installed and you dont want to try it -- remove it.

The SUSE scripts in 10.3 emit all of the iwconfig-commands before the interface is brought up. But at least the ESSID vanishes when the interface is brought up. So I've added a line
POST_UP_SCRIPT='set_essid.sh'
to the file /etc/sysconfig/network/ifcfg-wlan0
and created an executable file
/etc/sysconfig/network/scripts/set_essid.sh
containing the lines
[code1rmmg4r0]#! /bin/bash
iwconfig wlan0 essid WHATEVERITIS
[/code1rmmg4r0]

Regards,
Welm